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This document contains the Linux SDK application guide.

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Uploaded at
2016-05-25 13:03:27
Last updated
2018-12-03 10:11:48
Version
1.26
Requirements
Linux OS
The following processors are supported:
x86 (32bit & 64bit)
ARM
PPC
MIPS

The following devices are supported:
MC77xx
MC83x5
SL/MC9090
EM/MC73xx
AR7554
EM/MC74xx
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Question

How can we capture DM serial port logs for Sierra Wireless EM/MC series cellular modules in Linux?

Solution

In the Sierra Wireless QMI SDK downloadable archive there is a a DM log tool in the tools folder.
Run the dmcapture.sh script with desired filter, and the ttyUSB0 (DM port) device selected.

E.g. like this:
sudo ./dmcapture.sh -l -d /dev/ttyUSB0 -o testlog -f ./filters/v11026_Generic_GSM_WCDMA_LTE_IP.sqf

This will create a log file that can be sent for analyze and debug to Sierra Wireless.

Question

How do I set USB-interface modes on my Sierra Wireless module?

Solution

Sierra Wireless modules can expose different USB interfaces, like MBIM, MODEM, NMEA or RMNET. The different interfaces can be combined or used individually, depending on the specific need for your project.
Here is how to set the different USB interface configurations. (In this example we use a Sierra Wireless EM7421, but it will be similar for many other Sierra Wireless modules.)

Make sure you get an OK after every AT command sent.
We start by typing:
AT
To be able to view what we just sent to the module we type:
ATE1
Since this feature is password protected we need to type:
AT!ENTERCND=”A710”
To see what USB interface we are currently using, just type AT!USBCOMP? and you should receive something like this:

Config Index: 1
Config Type: 3 (Generic)
Interface bitmask: 0000010D (diag,nmea,modem,rmnet0)
OK

Config index is what the type applies to and should be set to 1.
The config type means what USB composition is used. For this module USBIF-MBIM (1), PCIE USBIF (2), Legacy Generic (3) or RNDIS (4) are available.
Interface bitmask is the part where we see what USB interface our module is set to.

Now, to see what our USB interface options are we need to type:
AT!USBCOMP=?
Here we can see that for this module we have the following options:
DIAG - 0x00000001
NMEA - 0x00000004
MODEM - 0x00000008
RMNET0 - 0x00000100
MBIM - 0x00001000
These values are hexadecimal. So, for an example, if we wanted to activate all the options (DIAG, NMEA, MODEM and MBIM) we just add these values together.
If we open the Windows Calculator in Programmer mode (and make sure you have “HEX” selected!) and add all the values together like this 1 + 4+ 8 +1000, we will get 100D. (Please note, RMNET0 and MBIM cannot be used simultaneous for this module. Refer to the manual of your specific module to when setting up the USB interface.)
If we then send the following AT command to the module, we will set it to DIAG, NMEA, MODEM and MBIM:
AT!USBCOMP=1,3,100D

Again, type AT!USBCOMP? to confirm we have the new settings selected, it should look like this:

Config Index: 1
Config Type: 3 (Generic)
Interface bitmask: 0000100D (diag,nmea,modem,mbim)
OK

For further information please take a look at the AT command user guide available on the product's specific page under "technical documentation", which is available for download once logged in.